DISCOURSE as quilting

Welcome to the intersection of P. L. Thomas writing about his writing and other writers' writing to explore discourse as quilting.

Archive for October 2013

remnant 37: “‘If you think of someone enough, you’re sure to meet them again'”

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“It’s strange, isn’t it?” the woman said in a pensive voice. “Everything is blowing up around us, but there are still those who care about a broken lock, and others who are dutiful enough to try to fix it. . . . But maybe that’s the way it should be. Maybe working on the little things as dutifully and honestly as we can is how we stay sane when the world is falling apart.”…

The woman picked up her black bag and, still bent over, headed for the door.

“Will I see you again?” Samsa asked one last time.

“If you think of someone enough, you’re sure to meet them again,” she said in parting. This time there was real warmth in her voice….

The only thing he knew for certain was that he wanted to see that hunchback girl again. To sit face to face and talk to his heart’s content. To unravel the riddles of the world with her. He wanted to watch from every angle the way she twisted and writhed when she adjusted her brassiere. If possible, he wanted to run his hands over her body. To touch her soft skin and feel her warmth with his fingertips. To walk side by side with her up and down the staircases of the world.

Just thinking about her made him warm inside. No longer did he wish to be a fish or a sunflower—or anything else, for that matter. He was glad to be human. For sure, it was a great inconvenience to have to walk on two legs and wear clothes. There were so many things he didn’t know. Yet had he been a fish or a sunflower, and not a human being, he might never have experienced this emotion. So he felt.

“Samsa in Love,” Haruki Murakami

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Written by plthomasedd

October 31, 2013 at 7:13 pm

Posted in Franz Kafka, Haruki Murakami, remnant 37

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remnant 36: “I believe…”

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Future 40’s (String of Pearls) Lyrics

Hey man I’m making moves
and I am so much stronger than you.
I am so much stronger,
I am so much stronger than you.
Everybody thinks the way that we thought,
we thought ahead and look what we got.
I did not invent this world,
Call my words a string of pearls.
But you will find the sheen
loses all its luster.

—–

“I Believe”

R.E.M.

Lifes Rich Pageant

When I was young and full of grace
and spirited–a rattlesnake.
When I was young and fever fell
My spirit, I will not tell
You’re on your honor not to tell

I believe in coyotes and time as an abstract
Explain the change, the difference between
What you want and what you need, there’s the key,
Your adventure for today, what do you do
Between the horns of the day?

I believe my shirt is wearing thin
And change is what I believe in

When I was young and give and take
And foolish said my fool awake
When I was young and fever fell
My spirit, I will not tell
You’re on your honor, on your honor

Trust in your calling, make sure your calling’s true
Think of others, the others think of you
Silly rule golden words make, practice, practice makes perfect,
Perfect is a fault, and fault lines change

I believe my humor’s wearing thin
And change is what I believe in

I believe my shirt is wearing thin
And change is what I believe in

When I was young and full of grace
As spirited a rattlesnake
When I was young and fever fell
My spirit, I will not tell
You’re on your honor, on your honor
I believe in example
I believe my throat hurts
Example is the checker to the key

I believe my humor’s wearing thin
And I believe the poles are shifting

I believe my shirt is wearing thin
And change is what I believe in

Written by plthomasedd

October 17, 2013 at 2:04 pm

Posted in R.E.M., remnant 36

remnant 35: “Is that what writing amounts to?”

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It had helped to keep her sane, that writing? Then, when time had begun again and real people had entered it, she’d abandoned it here. Now it’s a whisper from the past.

Is that what writing amounts to? The voice your ghost would have, if it had a voice? If so, why is she teaching this practice to little Blackbeard? Surely the Crakers would be happier without it. (pp. 282-283)

MaddAddam, Margaret Atwood

Written by plthomasedd

October 14, 2013 at 9:05 pm

remnant 34: Orwell “loved his country and its working people”

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All of which brings us back to Orwell. He didn’t think much of the king and queen. But he loved his country and its working people. He was a socialist but in a pragmatic way, hoping that the conditions of the poor and powerless would be improved. But most importantly, he opposed abstractions of every kind: fascism, Communism and nationalism. He recognized that Americanism was a term that easily could be exploited for totalitarian ends.

Living the Orwellian LifeKathleen Sharp (Truthout)

Written by plthomasedd

October 13, 2013 at 12:12 pm

Posted in George Orwell, remnant 34

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